Raise your hand for buckets of joy!

In a conversation in the car, our second grader asked a unique question. “Have you ever heard of a bucket filler?” she inquired. She then proceeded to tell us how every person has a bucket that is filled with joy and represents how they feel. She shared that everyone has an opportunity to be a bucket filler, and help others feel joy, or a bucket dumper, spilling the joy of others – just as she shares here:

After listening to her genius, we took to Amazon and found numerous books on the subject, but for us the concept was very clear:

Think about how the things you do and say impact others and act accordingly.

This message is so relatable when simplified as bucket filling or bucket dumping.

I hope this little gem helps you find greater success your relationship with your child.

Contact me at Kimberly@LutzLearning.com or surf around our school site to learn how in classrooms with no walls we offer education with no ceiling! www.lutzlearning.com

Enjoy the journey, the future is in our hands!

Kimberly Wilson

Author of SmartCookie: Recipes for Raising a Genius, available here on Amazon.com

Right Ways to Fix Wrong Choices

We’ve all been there, you’ve asked your child for the umpteenth time to either complete a simple task, “Will you please get your shoes on?!” or stop a behavior, “Don’t jump on the couch!” and you know they hear you but you also don’t see them listening.

Even if, unlike my home, it’s not shoes and couches that you struggle with, here are some tips to help you get your child to make the right choice – you know, the one that means you don’t have to ask three times.

  1. Sandwich your request between your expectation and a solid dose of praise.

There’s no 2. because it’s really that simple. Just like we all prefer our work to come with a side of a paycheck, children deserve the same praise and admiration for a job well done. Children aim to please, they constantly seek your attention and crave positive affirmations.  Use that truth to channel your child’s behavior. I want you to speak into your child the results you want to see and if you present the request correctly, and they hear you, nine times out of ten they will listen.

Instead of asking for the third time if your child has their shoes on yet, try the first time “I really need you to get your shoes on and I can’t wait to see what a good listener you’re going to be!”

When your child is jumping on the couch they are not supposed to be jumping on, try “I really appreciate it when you remember our rules about jumping on that couch.”

Sometimes coming at behaviors and the expectations we have of our children can be just as simple as the way we ask the first time which prevents us from having to ask a second and third time.

I hope following this plan helps you find greater success your relationship with your child.

Contact me at Kimberly@LutzLearning.com or surf around our school site to learn how in classrooms with no walls we offer education with no ceiling! www.lutzlearning.com

Enjoy the journey, the future is in our hands!

Kimberly Wilson

Author of SmartCookie: Recipes for Raising a Genius, available here on Amazon.com